Biscuits and Homemade Sausage Gravy

I never tasted biscuits and gravy until I was 18 years old and working as a counselor at a summer camp, where every Thursday morning the dining hall served the southern-style breakfast treat. This northern girl was instantly hooked.

When I got married years later, I inherited a simple sausage gravy recipe from my mother-in law. I made a few tweaks to it, and this is what I now serve my own family.

It has become our tradition to make biscuits and sausage gravy for breakfast on Christmas morning in our house. I fry up the sausage while the kids play with their new toys and while we listen to Christmas music. It’s a great meal any time of the year, though.

I serve this with store-bought refrigerated biscuits because they’re so easy to prepare, but you can make homemade biscuits using your own recipe, too.

biscuits and gravy

Biscuits and Homemade Sausage Gravy

Ingredients:

1 lb. ground sausage

1/2 cup white flour

4 cups milk (I use whole milk, which makes the gravy a little more rich, but you can use whatever type of milk you prefer)

salt and pepper to taste

1 to 2 cans of ready-to-bake refrigerated biscuits, depending on how much your family eats (or use your own favorite biscuit recipe)

Directions:

In a large skillet, brown the sausage and drain off the fat. Meanwhile, in a large bowl mix the white flour and the milk and stir with a whisk until smooth. Add the flour and milk mixture to the cooked sausage in the skillet. Add salt and pepper to taste and cook for about 10 to 15 minutes, stirring frequently, until the sauce thickens. Serve atop hot biscuits sliced in half.

My family of four usually uses about 1 and a half cans of refrigerated biscuits to eat all of this gravy (and we get more than one meal out of this recipe). After the sausage gravy is gone, we eat any leftover biscuits with butter and jam, or we make breakfast sandwiches with fried eggs, cheese, and bacon.

Enjoy!

About Rachael

Rachael is the creator of Shop From Your Pantry. She is a freelance writer and editor, and you can learn more about her work at www.rachaelsjohnston.com.
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